Saturday, August 11, 2018

A Book for New Times

     I recently finished a book entitled Waking Up in 5D: A Practical Guide to Multidimensional Transformation by Maureen St. Germain.  If you believe that the New Age is upon us and want to know how to prepare, this book is for you.

     The author, a specialist in personal development and spiritual awakening, has detailed how we are changing into fifth dimensional awareness.  By this she means that we are evolving from a third and fourth dimensional awareness, which are dualistic, us-versus-them, tribalistic ways of being.  In the fifth dimension, she writes, we are more aware that we are all one, that love is all there is, and that karma has no more power.  I still have trouble with conceiving a world without karma (the little, mean part of me wants to see a couple people get what I think they deserve), but if our world could realize that what we do to others we do to ourselves because we are all one, it would go a long way toward peace and justice on our planet.

     Physically, we are changing from a carbon-based body to a crystalline-based body.  I have difficulty visualizing that, but I guess we'll understand better by and by.

     If you want to know more about what this next step in our evolution will be like, this book is for you.  Just a couple of caveats: an editor would have done great things to help give this book more polish by nipping the excessive use of exclamation marks (it feels like shouting) and the occasional paragraph where the same sentence appears twice.  As for me, I would have liked to have more information about some of the meditation practices without having to go on her website to order more books or downloads.  Still, those are relatively minor things to overlook for the good information in this book.

Saturday, August 4, 2018

Talking Trees and Other Thoughts

     Some time ago I read an article in which certain scientists were studying how trees communicate with each other.  Apparently, trees send out hormonal signals when they sense danger (such as an animal or insect eating them), change the taste of their leaves so repel invaders, and even assist their offspring to grow by shielding them from harsh environmental factors and bringing up water to the smaller trees' roots. And scientists are barely scratching the surface of what trees are able to do. As one scientist, Allen Larocque said, "We don't know what they're saying with pheromones most of the time.  We don't know how they communicate within their own bodies.  They don't have nervous systems, but they can still feel what's going on, and experience something analogous to pain.  When a  tree is cut, it sends electrical signals like wounded human tissue."

     Wow.  How cool is that?

     But this got me to thinking -- during the times that I have been in empathic contact with trees, what am I "hearing"?  Am I in contact with their pheromones?  Is it some quasi-electrical communication?  Or am I sensing something deeper -- like their essence or even their soul?

     I really don't know.

     But I would like to think that someday humans will realize that they are not the only thinking and feeling species on this planet.  We need to greatly expand our idea of what life is.  Even Mary Oliver, the wonderful poet, has remarked on how stones talk to her.  Who's to say they don't?

     And once we make this grand realization that we aren't the only thinkers and feelers on planet Earth, perhaps we will take the giant step to treating all other creatures and rocks and pine cones and trees and dandelions and earthworms with compassion and care.  Wouldn't that be something?

(photo courtesy of pixabay.com)

Saturday, July 28, 2018

A Quote for Our Times

"The struggle to see things as they are
is perhaps the fundamental driver of Western civilization. 
There is a long but direct line
from Aristotle and Archimedes
to Locke, Hume, Mill, and Darwin,
and from there through Orwell and Churchill
to Martin Luther King writing
his "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." 
It is the agreement that objective reality exists,
that people of goodwill can perceive it,
and that other people will change their views
when presented with the facts of the matter."

Thomas E. Ricks, journalist and author


Saturday, July 21, 2018

A Quote for This Week

     "Democracy is not a static thing. 
It does not stand still. 
If we don't keep finding ways
to expand and deepen democracy,
we will see it diminish."

Dr. Vincent Harding, a close associate of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Saturday, July 14, 2018

A Quote for Today

     "Man's capacity for justice makes democracy possible, but man's inclination to injustice makes democracy necessary."  

Reinhold Niebuhr in The Children of Light and the Children of Darkness

Wednesday, July 4, 2018

Happy Independence Day

May you be free of fear.
May you be free of want.
May you be free to follow your heart
And fulfill your destiny in peace.

Happy Independence Day.

(photo courtesy of pixabay.com)



Saturday, June 30, 2018

A Fabulous Book, Part 2

     The magic of novels is that they can give you an inside look into a lifestyle or philosophy, as Deng Ming-Dao did in his fabulous book, Chronicles of Tao: The Secret Life of a Taoist Master.  I learned far more about Taoism than I have in any of the other books I've reviewed these last several months.

    And why?  Because it portrays a human being, in this case, Saihung, with all his faults and doubts and struggles.  It could go from his internal monologue to his interactions with his Taoist master or his difficulties in maintaining his belief system in the secular world.

     And that, for me, is the magic of novels.  I could have written The Gemini Bond as a dry exploration of Twin Souls and how the concept is found in science and nature and mythology, but following Rissa's journey, I thought, would be far more illuminating.  For example:  How does she handle her psychic visions?  What does the recognition of a Twin to another feel like?  What does the aftermath entail?  That is the power of fiction.  It illumines the real in ways that dry academia cannot.

     In any case, treat yourself to a novel sometime.  You may enjoy the story, but your heart and mind may transformed by the power of the journey.